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Monday, October 30, 2006

Skypecast and Wiki Awards Ceremony Tonight



I'm going to attempt to host my first full skypecast and we have an ambitious agenda. This is the culmination of amazing week of wikis at our k12wiki.wikispaces.com. The pages were absolutely amazing and I'm going to feature them in the upcoming weeks.

I hope you'll join us tonight at our 8 PM EST Skypecast. Here is the information and the agenda. I will say that less than 5 points separated our top five scoring wikis! It was very competitive! The winners will be in your classroom!

Here is the plan:

SkypeCast at 8 PM EST tonight, Monday, October 30th!


1 - Go to (https://skypecasts.skype.com/skypecasts/skypecast/detailed.html?id_talk=45270) on Monday, October 30, at 8 pm EST. (I will be there at 7:40 to test things out.)
2- Sign in.
3 - If you have trouble - send a text message via skype to coolcatteacher for help. (Before the show starts, after it starts, it will be too late!)

Agenda for the Skypecast Monday


For K12 wiki participants: I have included the order and the listing of those who have let me know they will be in on Monday. Please e-mail me at coolcatteacher@gmail.com if you plan to attend so that I can add you to the agenda. Agenda for you to edit (Go to the agenda for you to edit to add your name and info. I also want you to add your blog there if you have not e-mailed it.)

  • 8 pm EST
    Welcome from Vicki and an overview of the project (Vicki Davis)

  • 5 minutes
    Overview of Tandem learning process and potential with wiki projects. (Vicki Davis, Sharon Peters)

  • 5-7 minutes
    Introduction of Judges - Stewart Mader, Jennifer Wagner, Andrea cannot attend but will send me some notes.
    From this point on, Stewart and Jen will "jump in" as they have thoughts about the wiki projects.

  • 20 minutes
    Discussion from those groups that would like to share their wiki experience - 20 minutes

    • Wiki #2 - Math - Effective Math Videos - Jeanne Simpson and Chris Harbeck - (Both will attend)
    • Wiki #8-Technology - Disruptive Technology in the Classroom - Cheryl Lykowski and Vinnie Vrotny
    • Wiki # 10- Technology- Student Data Storage- Beth Shenefiel (Beth will share comments from Celeste)
    • Wiki # 7 - Social studies Citizen Journalism Code of Ethics - Reuven Werber - via podcast (3 AM is an ungodly hour!)

      Other Wikis (Time Permitting)
    • Wiki #10 Student Data Storage
    • Wiki #9 Tagging
    • Wiki #11 Internet Safety
    • Wiki #1 Student Art Galleries
    • Wiki #3 Tandem Learning in learning languages
    • Wiki #4 Self Publishing
    • Wiki #5 Tandem Learning in Language Arts
    • Wiki #6 Simulation in Sciences

10 minutes
Discussion from judges about what they observed was effective on the wiki project. (Point out things you liked about each wiki.)
  • Stewart Mader
  • Jennifer Wagner
  • Vicki will read notes from Andrea Forte

5 minutes
Announcement of winners:
Each participant who contributed - New thing to add onto your resume. (Will post the names of contributors to a page.)
  • 3rd place (tie)
  • 2nd place
  • 1st place
  • Best Wiki of Conference

5 minutes
Where do we go from here?
  • Announcement from Jennifer Wagner of Technospud projects about classroom matching for wikis.
  • Wiki projects.

5 minutes
Recap and challenge from presenter Vicki Davis

Saturday, October 28, 2006

The best Web 2 article this week was written by a 19 year old!



Wow! Nineteen year old blogger-prodigy Brian Benzinger over at Solution Watch has done an amazing three part series on Web 2.0 in the classroom. READ IT!!

It is an essential must read and must share set of articles. I have read each of them and highlighted the article's content and my biggest "take aways" for you.

Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0, Part 1
Oh my goodness, You have to read this one! It would take a student to start as he did, with the students. (I think us teachers tend to start the process with us, however, true education is something that happens WITHIN a student not TO a student.)

He reviews student organizers. I am going to have computer science test and review the following: Stu.dicio.us (student organizer and social notetaking tool), Gradefix (homework tracker), and mynoteIT (note taking.)

He also profiles teacher and club management options, including some course management options that may be great for those of us not wanting to undertake open source installations on our local server.

I'm going to show our math department
Create a Graph. When we do resume building, job hunting skills, I am going to familiarize my seniors with Emurse (online job hunting/resume building with tracking stats on the hits taken on your resume!), and we will use hResume Creator to take our resumes and make them HTML compatible for our e-portfolio project. We will also review the "best news source for students," as he puts it - Newsvine. Brian says:

"I could have picked any ol’ news site for this post, but Newsvine is, in my opinion, the best news source for students. It’s a clean and friendly social news site containing articles from the Associated Press, ESPN, and New Scientist as well as user contributions. Students can browse the site comfortably, rate news articles, participate in article discussion, and even start their own news column where they can write and publish articles. More on Newsvine."


Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0, Part 2

This great article discusses office applications, web based applications, and thoughts on whether web-apps are ready for education. (I would ask is education ready for web apps.)

This is a great article for those looking at other technologies to integrate into the classroom. I reworked the curriculum this year for my ninth grade class and used a model I call the "intuitive learning" model. I developed it from my over thirty years of computer use. People have always asked me, "Vicki, how can you sit down at a new computer program and know how to use it so quickly." Well, without knowing it, I had a system. That is what I'm teaching my students. I teach them to learn how to learn.

My ninth grade class this semester focuses on word processing, however they have also used writely, zohowriter, Google Docs (after it gobbled up writely), wikispaces, and classblogmeister. (We're doing a short module on web pages in word and will then go to Google Page Creator.) After reading Brian's post, the next word processing target is Writeboard.

(There is also a hidden gem in there, Competitio.us -- although it is used for competitive intelligence tracking for business, it has the ability to do feature comparison matrices that are amazing. I am going to have my students use it in computer graphic design when they "invent" their companies with products to market. I always have them do an analysis of the competitive landscape. I will also use it for their genuine assessment in Computer Fundamentals when I have them compare the aspects of various word processors. It is a graphic organizer tool par exellence! Wow!)

Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0 Part 3
Blogging, photosharing, educational podcasting, wikis, videosharing, Web 2.0 courses, School 2.0, and some other cases including a fascinating Harvard class that is being offered for free over at Second Life. Brian says:

It may sound odd, but some students are now learning in their SecondLife. Harvard Law School has recently started a new course called, CyberOne, where students actually log into their SecondLife account and learn in the massively popular virtual world. The CyberOne course website states, “Enrollment to the Harvard Extension School is open to the public. Extension students will experience portions of the class through a virtual world, known as Second Life. Videos, discussions, lectures, and office hours will all take place on Berkman Island. Students from anywhere in the world will be able to interact with one another, in real time.” For those of you interested, head over to the CyberOne website and watch this video trailer (YouTube) that can give you an idea of what to expect.
Note for people who think the world hasn't changed
These three well written, amazingly insightful education and Web 2.0 articles are written by a nineteen year old kid with an associates degree.

Bloggers take note and look at his style. Although he writes a long article, he clearly outlines for you in the opening sentence what his post is going to be about. (A habit I will emulate.) He has a great use of graphic tools (note the red arrows beside his favorite picks) and an effective use of hyperlinks. He refers back to his previous posts where need be.

These three posts reflect 20 or 30 hours at least of research (at least it would for me.)

The world is not just flat, it is upside down!


We are standing on our heads learning from those who used to be at the "bottom of the educational foodchain." (And I include myself at the bottom.)

My favorite college professor, Dr. Philip Adler, always told me,

"Vicki, if you set your mind to be the best, doors will open. The great leveler of discrimination is excellence because the world of the future is one where brain power is going to be vitally needed, and that world will be yours."


All of you who sit around having pity parties thinking that "I don't live in a good location." (I live in a town of 6,000. or "Poor me, I work at a small school." (I work at a school of 350 K-12.) or "I am behind." (I started in November 2005.) Stop the pity party and get blogging! You CAN make a difference!

This is a new day and as David Warlick said in his keynote of the K12online conference,

"The scale has tipped away from location and back in favor of talent."


The world is upside down.


Friday, October 27, 2006

What to do about filtration? Allow ad hoc distributed filtration!



Do you wrestle publicly?

I have been this week. I’ve been grappling with issues, new ideas, new tools, and a very exciting wiki project. I wrestle with the questions that plague educators everywhere. I wrestle with my good fortune. (And its public because I blog about it!) You see, I am a teacher but also have the good (or not so good) fortune to also be the technology administrator and I control my own filter.

Bud Hunt had a profound comment in the midst of his keynote this week. He was talking about an engaging discussion that he and his students were having about the problem of school violence. As they wrestled with thoughts about how to solve the problem, they began to “ask the Internet.” Immediately when they typed in “school violence” it triggered the filter. Bud says,

“It is frustrating to teach information management when you can’t find answers. Driving into a filter is like driving into a brick wall, it stifles interest in continuing the journey.”
I have control over my filter. If this were my scenario, I would go and allow the search and then after class, promptly turn off the ability to search those questions.

So, let's propose solutions!


I don’t like to complain without proposing solutions. I’ve had countless educators complain that they could only participate in the K12online project from home because it was blocked. Or the Math wiki being done by Jeanne Simpson and Chris Harbeck for the k12wiki project. Their assignment was to find and categorize math videos according to standards. However, Jean can look at the wiki, but because YouTube and Google video are blocked, she cannot see the embedded videos.

I would propose one of the following two solutions:

Ad Hoc Unblocking with Accountability

1) An adhoc login for teachers to allow something to be unblockedfor a specified period of time –

Teachers should have the ability to “sign into” the filtration service at their school. Then, they could use their username and password to enable a certain search or service for a specified period of time (i.e. October 30th from 8 – 9 am) I want youtube to be unblocked.

All use (or abuse) of the unblocked service would then be monitored. It would be the teacher’s responsibility for monitoring the use in their classroom. It would be tracked and monitored under the teacher’s user id. Think of it like signing up for a video projector or television cart. You are signing up for the use of a resource – access to a certain site or location.

Distributed filtration
2) Distributed filtration methodologies –

One of the drawbacks with the first suggestion is that some schools have one filtration service for the entire school system or school. I believe if there was a mechanism to have a primary filter installed for the school, but for technology classrooms to have their own filtration either through a virtual partition or separate device.

This would allow the technology classrooms to unblock and allow certain domains without affecting access for the whole school.

Let people do their job and hold them accountable.

Stop throwing rocks, please!

We have too much to do to keep throwing rocks at one another! Fighting over filtration causes resentment, inefficiencies, and frustration. There are valid points on both ends of the filtration discussion, however, the bottom line is this… student learning.

Student learning…

Student learning…

Not, "it needs to be easy for a technology administrator to manage."

I’m sorry, but classrooms are tough to manage too. Nothing about schools are easy and caveats abound. (Just ask principals who scratch their head with the student who always seems to find the one thing left out of the handbook!)

Neither does it does need to be, "everything should be unblocked and let teachers do anything they desire." We as teachers must be responsible and accountable.

The Fact about "Sex"

I mean, really, what teenage boy can resist typing in “sex” at Google? The word "Sex" should be blocked in 99.9% of the cases in schools.

However, what if a biology teacher is teaching asexual reproduction. Shouldn’t they be allowed to request that search be unblocked temporarily? (It happened last week, and I did unblock it!)

Accountability and Flexibility with filtration

This ad hoc method of enhancing filtration would give both accountability and flexibility. Would it be harder for technical administrators to handle? Sure it would.

Would it be harder for teachers to deal with than having everything unblocked? Sure.

But wise men know when to meet in the middle.

The teachers have to request the ad hoc unblocking of items and then administrators or tech support could allow or deny the request. We do so many other less important things this way, why not apply this to filtration?

Perhaps there is something out there that allows this. I actually have to log into my filter and unblock and reblock things. (I keep a list.)

Manufacturers need to take note.

Manufacturers who want to work with schools should get their act together and offer such an ability to progressive schools who know there is something more. (My husband who is from an industrial background wonders if something couldn’t be set up in Sharepoint to manage this.)

We’ve automated gradebooks, testing, attendance, lunchrooms, etc. and a piece of paper has to be filled out to unblock a website. In fact, there is NO system in place in many schools for getting sites unblocked. (According to the e-mails I get!)

This is about teaching.

Letting technology administrators with no accountability for curriculum or testing make all filtration decisions is about like letting the janitor decide how to lay out the room. (As we say in South Georgia, it is like “the tail wagging the dog!”)

Teachers should be able to group their desks for cooperative learning projects (some can't do that either -- if this is the case at your school, get Marzano's Classroom Management that Works and read the research) and they should be able to have a system for requesting access to online resources. It just makes sense.

To tell teachers to trust “Big Brother” with no method of recourse is telling them “Act like a professional, but I’m not going to treat you like one.” It is demeaning to the professionals that teachers are.

Leave the pity party and join the problem solving party.

So, folks, you know I don’t like pity parties and we've all heard enough complaints on this one. (Over and over and over at all live K12 conference events! It is the silent giant in the room.)

I've been a programmer,and I know we have the programming know how and ability out there to create interfaces to allow ad hoc teacher filtration and provide accountability.

There are enough GREAT technology administrators and principals out there who can tackle this one. There are enough trailblazing teachers who would take the responsibility seriously and come up with some best practices for handling such a system.

I want to know who is doing something like this? Does it exist? If it doesn’t, the discussion should start.

After all, I think most educators truly want what is best for student education. And if you think that you can’t find useful information in blocked places, go to the Math Wiki created for the K12 online conference and look at the videos that Chris and Jeanne are posting. That should be enough to convince even the most vehement opponent of ad hoc filtration.

Ad hoc filtration capabilities for teachers with administrative approval.

Somebody needs to be talking about this!

Let’s join the problem solving party and leave the pity party behind.

What do you think?

Thursday, October 26, 2006

One more reason to care



It is easy to fell overwhelmed and unimportant. It is easy to say, "that's not my problem" or "that's not my student" or "that's none of my business" when we see problems. But it has dire consequences.

For anyone who entertains the thought of being indifferent about the importance of educating our youth, tell them this story.

You see, the very nature of things can be disturbed by cold indifference. On March 29, 1948, everyone living within earshot of Niagara Falls squinted into the winter sunshine as they craned their necks to hear .... nothing.

Nothing, because heavy winds had pushed the ice fields of Lake Erie to block the entrance of the Niagara River near Buffalo, NY. The river had stopped. Against the natural order and every law of nature, icy, cold obstacles stopped the natural order of things.

It resumed only when the ice shifted.


I would challenge you to consider that many of our educational problems stem from cold indifference. Indifference of some who would rather filter out everything instead of working with teachers to unblock certain sites in an ad hoc manner. Indifference of those who would rather force schools to conform to their knowledge base than to learn something new. Indifference of those who think that yesterday's success in the classroom will also be the savior of tomorrow. Indifference of those who just want to get a paycheck and would rather play Solitaire. Indifference of people who would rather throw money at problems than their lives.

Educating children and teens requires passion.
I believe that a good teacher has one thing undergirding everything in their classroom... an honest, genuine love for their students. Because students see frigid indifference and they tune it out. They see enough frigidity in this tough, cold world.

What they want to see are warm bodies with open arms who will push them to excellence beyond what they realize that they can do. Teachers and administrators who will push their own envelope of knowledge before they ask students to do the same. Teachers who don't just "bide their time," call in sick to staff development, and complain.
I'm sorry, folks, but if somebody invited me to a pity party ... I'd skip.
No one wants to be around the hopeless, indifferent frigidity of a person who has given up the dream of making a difference!

Educating is truly the greatest calling on earth.
Instead of just putting money in the bank, you are carving meaning into the lives of students and leaving a mark on your own soul. If you truly love your students. If you truly give them all you have and come home at the end of the day used up on your quota of words and wondering how you will even move from one room to the next. If you teach with all you have and all you are. If you care so much that you lay awake at night thinking and praying about how to reach that one student who is not just getting it...

then you have achieved greatness.

You, my friend, are great because you have poured out your one life and multiplied all of the love and passion you have into hundreds and thousands of other lives.

Sadly, I had a student transfer in this year. I asked him who his teachers were last year.. he couldn't tell me their names. He said that was "OK, because none of them knew his name anyway."

This profession is about caring. It is about doing the impossible and reaching the remote.

It is about striking that rock of knowledge against the flint of an unlit psyche so many times and with such persistence that sparks emerge and catch fire the flame of the quest for knowledge that will never be extinguished.

We must always want to be better. We must be willing to put up with being misunderstood, underappreciated, and underpaid. For, what we do, if we truly care, we would do without compensation.

Teaching is a noble profession, the most noble in my opinion. I've never felt so rewarded and so full of meaning in my life. My river will never stop because of indifference.

What about you?


The most exciting K12 wiki project I've ever seen!



We've entered Phase 3

I must say that this project is getting very exciting! With over 30 educators from almost every continent, the wiki work is heating up! I had over 64 edits in my bloglines after I retired last night at 10:30! Some of the work is amazing!

As I and the moderators of each area worked to create the "critical questions" for this project we asked ourselves several questions:
  1. What are some topics that will require even the most highly educated teacher to do a little digging on the Internet? (We want to give the experience of learning via wiki.)
  2. What questions, if they were answered in a meaningful format, would most help other educators in this emerging Web 2.0 world?
  3. What questions do we think are most important for helping students succeed?
I was so excited when we finished the questions and the participants started posting, I actually did a few leaps for joy at my desk! This is a great project!

I am giving you a copy of what I"ve posted on the wiki homepage -- if any of the links do not work, go to http://k12wiki.wikispaces.com. And if you see a question you could contribute to, then ask to join up. I will allow up to 5 participants on each wiki through tomorrow. We really need another person on the Science area so we can do that wiki!

Reprinted from K12wiki project

Current Wiki Notes from Vicki

K12 Online Conference Team Assignments have been made. Go to your subject page for specifics. I've posted an overview of each question and the participants on this home page.


Introduction to Wikis Presentation and Resources (including video)

Team Assignments


Where are they?

Assignments with details about how to start are found on the subject pages.

Subjects

Arts Math Languages Literature Science Social Studies Technology Elementary Ed

Overview of Assignments

Wiki #1 - Arts

Virtual Art Galleries
Students crave an audience. Some art programs are beginning to experiment with virtual art galleries. Your assignment is to propose guidelines for an effective online student art gallery and some methods that may be used by beginners to do this in ways that teach art, provide an audience, and protect privacy. Participants: ckaminski, sadams23 - Orlando, FL

Wiki #2 - Math

Effective Math Videos
It is can be difficult to “differentiate instruction” for Math. With the inception of GoogleVideo and youtube, an increasing number of entertaining, informative math videos have become available to supplement the math curriculum. The problem is that most math educators do not know that they are there. Your wiki assignment is to find video on the web that could supplement a math curriculum. Include a hyperlink to the video (or embed it in the wiki). List the objective that is taught through the video, and your suggestions how it may be used. Optionally, if you find classrooms that are effectively using video as a mechanism to reinforce math concepts, share that information. Participants: charbeck1, Winnipeg Manitoba Canada; JSGeometry Decatur, AL

Wiki #3 - Languages

Tandem Learning in Language Instruction
What is tandem learning? What are ways it can be used in the high school language classroom through the use of technology? (Include hyperlinks, resources, and examples.) Participants: MrsEngra Camilla,Ga.- Spanish; langwitches, Jacksonville, FL - Spanish

Wiki #4 - Literature

Self Publishing for Teachers
Every student loves an audience, but many classrooms are not allowed to blog or wiki. Self-publishing is an emerging option for some teachers to consider. What are some self-publishing resources that are easy for teachers to use and instructions for their use? Can you find any examples of schools or teachers already doing this? What ideas do you have for their use? Participants: catenglish Camilla, GA; nancyscofield, Colorado City, CO; texasschoolmarm, Camp Wood, TX

Wiki #5 - Literature

Tandem Learning in Language Arts
What is tandem learning? How can tandem learning be used with student writing? Propose a tandem learning structure for the posting and evaluation of essays using Internet-enabled technology. (Include the structure for the student posting the essay, the student evaluating the essay,and the teacher(s).) Participants: readerdiane; crisp, Nicholasville, Kentucky

Wiki #6 - Science (Need one more participant.)

Simulated Laboratory Resources for K-12 science
Computer laboratories are starting to replace the hands-on labs used in some advanced science courses. Look up some articles on the debate. It is difficult for teachers to determine which experiment should be done in the simulated laboratories and which should be done in an actual lab. Find some experiments. Include a hyperlink to the experiment, the hypotheses that is being tested, and your opinion about whether it would be better to do in a real environment or the simulated one. Participants: wbosworth, Greendale, WI USA
Because there is only one person signed up under Science, this participant may either: recruit other people, post alone, or join another assignment of your choice.

Wiki #7 - Social Studies

[[Code of Ethics for Teaching Citizen Journalists|]]Citizen Journalism Code of Ethics
What is grassroots journalism (a/k/a citizen journalism) and what are examples of how it has affected recent news? Include examples. Propose a code of ethics for citizen journalists that could be shared in a high school or middle school classroom. Participants: julielindsay - Bangladesh; reuw - Kibbutz Kfar Etzion, Israel; mrehberg - Jackson, MI

Wiki #8 - Technology

Disruptive Technology in the Classroom
What is disruptive technology? Why is it called that? Create a list of disruptive technology, explain why it is considered disruptive and try to find one example of each technology being used to teach in an effective manner. Participants: qdsouza - Toronto, Canada; CLykowski - Lambertville, Michigan; jgates513, Summerdale PA.; aquiram - Yuma, AZ

Wiki #9 - Technology

Tagging to help Teachers
A wealth of curricula are being uploaded to youTube, Google Video, blogs, wikis, podcasts, etc. Some of things are being “tagged” appropriately and some are not. (See also folksonomy.) What is tagging? How can teachers use “tagging” to catalog their work? What would be the benefits of tagging standards? Create a proposed standard procedure that can be given to teachers to help them determine how to “tag” their digital work that is uploaded to the Internet so that it can be found and used appropriately. Participants: reuw - Kibbutz Kfar Etzion, Israel, rmom - Unionville, PA, jfriesen - Austin, TX, eweinb04

Wiki #10 - Technology

Student Data Storage- Needs and Methods
Students are increasingly required to produce and accumulate digital work. It is often stored in computer labs and purged at the end of the year. What is student data storage? Is it needed? You are to create a proposed methodology for student data storage that would be accessible to students after high school and also protects student privacy, rights and is fair (length of time it is available.) Participants: bookbird, Aliquippa, PA; maloneGE -VA; susanvg; cm_scholz - Cairo, Egypt

Note from Vicki: I almost took this one off, but when I showed my students the five questions I had drafted, they voted this one on. They said that this is their single biggest frustration and worry. Some students at other schools have created whole video productions that were "lost" over the summer. Students feel that they have a right to theri digital work and it often harms them when they cannot secure copies of their resume, etc. If our job as educators is to help students, this is an essential issue that should be discussed. I hope the participants will be excited about this assignment because my students said and I quote, "Teachers need to talk about protecting student digital work, it can be there to educate our grandchildren!"

Wiki #11 - Elementary Ed

Elementary School Internet Safety Code of Conduct
One of the risks of bringing elementary students online is that of internet safety and privacy. Propose an internet safety code of conduct for elementary teachers. (include hyperlinks.) Optionally, you may include a list of reasons that elementary students participate in online activites. (You may include examples of worthwhile projects. This should include hyperlinks.) Participants: mjantzi Gifted Ed.Teacher (Gds. K-5) in Virginia; Brune (Gordon Brune), 5th Grade Teacher, Mamaroneck, NY; mrdarylpearson - Saskatchewan, Canada; coffey - Virginia


Is it too late to sign up?


(You may request to join projects in progress through Friday 10/27. Limit 5 per project.)
A - Get an account with wikispaces
B - Request to join this space
(Tell me your name, your school, your location, the age you teach, and a little about yourself and the PROJECT YOU WISH TO JOIN in the comments. I will do my best to accommodate everyone, but may not be able to.)
C- I will add your name to the project that you are assigned here on this home page.
D- Go to the home page of this wiki - http://k12wiki.wikispaces.com.
Click the Notify me tab and sign up for either e-mail updates or updates via RSS.
(This will tell you when we've entered the next phase of the project. Just make sure to check your e-mail/ RSS reader on Wednesday to see your instructions for editing. Or just come back here.)


Guidelines to Get Started


Here are the recommended steps.
1- The hyperlink above is the page that has been created to wiki this topic. (Click on the page to go there and begin editing.)
2 - First you should divide up the question into major headings. Type them in the wiki. Leave space in between for the text.
3 - Start by defining the topic. You may want to search on wikipedia or Google. Read information, go back to your wiki page, click edit, and summarize the information. Include a hyperlink to the source of your information.
4 - Repeat #3 until you have a good definition.
5 - Read what you have on the wiki and ask yourself, "What do I still not understand?" Go to the Internet and answer that question. Come back and post.
6 - Remember to subscribe to your page on the Notify Me tab so you know when your partner(s) posts!

How long should I spend?


We are recommending 10 minutes on one day, then, walk away and let your partner post. Then, add 10 minutes the next day.
Judges will be e-mailed a list of projects which have postings on Sunday morning at 9 am EST. You should complete your postings to the wiki by then, although you are encouraged to update your wiki project any time you have additional information.

What if I don't know anything about the topic?


The topics were selected are emerging, new topics. The purpose of this project is to show you how wikis create experts on a topic within a very short period of time. You will find that your research on the Internet causes you to form an opinion and add it to your current knowledge base. Remember, Wikis are not word processors. Go out to the Internet, grab a "nugget" and come back and post and save.


Project Notes


  • All project instructions will be posted to the home page of this website.
  • For complete project instructions, visit the project page.
  • If you want to "play" on the wiki, go to the sandbox. Remember that people who post innappropriate information will be removed from the space!

How do I get Help?


Help

We have created a mini help on wikispaces section to help you.

Discussion Area

Go in the discussion area to discuss questions with your partner. (Remember to subscribe to the changes on your page!)

Moderators

You have Moderators available to help you. If you post your question in the discussion area, they are "patrolling" via RSS and will emerge to help you and answer your questions on Thursday and Friday. (Moderators will not available on the weekend.)If you need help, you can go to the brief guide on this space or click help in the top right corner of every wikipage.

Current Wiki Notes from Vicki

K12 Online Conference Team Assignments have been made. Go to your subject page for specifics. I've posted an overview of each question and the participants on this home page.


Introduction to Wikis Presentation and Resources (including video)

Team Assignments


Where are they?

Assignments with details about how to start are found on the subject pages.

Subjects

Arts Math Languages Literature Science Social Studies Technology Elementary Ed

Overview of Assignments

Wiki #1 - Arts

Virtual Art Galleries
Students crave an audience. Some art programs are beginning to experiment with virtual art galleries. Your assignment is to propose guidelines for an effective online student art gallery and some methods that may be used by beginners to do this in ways that teach art, provide an audience, and protect privacy. Participants: ckaminski, sadams23 - Orlando, FL

Wiki #2 - Math

Effective Math Videos
It is can be difficult to “differentiate instruction” for Math. With the inception of GoogleVideo and youtube, an increasing number of entertaining, informative math videos have become available to supplement the math curriculum. The problem is that most math educators do not know that they are there. Your wiki assignment is to find video on the web that could supplement a math curriculum. Include a hyperlink to the video (or embed it in the wiki). List the objective that is taught through the video, and your suggestions how it may be used. Optionally, if you find classrooms that are effectively using video as a mechanism to reinforce math concepts, share that information. Participants: charbeck1, Winnipeg Manitoba Canada; JSGeometry Decatur, AL

Wiki #3 - Languages

Tandem Learning in Language Instruction
What is tandem learning? What are ways it can be used in the high school language classroom through the use of technology? (Include hyperlinks, resources, and examples.) Participants: MrsEngra Camilla,Ga.- Spanish; langwitches, Jacksonville, FL - Spanish

Wiki #4 - Literature

Self Publishing for Teachers
Every student loves an audience, but many classrooms are not allowed to blog or wiki. Self-publishing is an emerging option for some teachers to consider. What are some self-publishing resources that are easy for teachers to use and instructions for their use? Can you find any examples of schools or teachers already doing this? What ideas do you have for their use? Participants: catenglish Camilla, GA; nancyscofield, Colorado City, CO; texasschoolmarm, Camp Wood, TX

Wiki #5 - Literature

Tandem Learning in Language Arts
What is tandem learning? How can tandem learning be used with student writing? Propose a tandem learning structure for the posting and evaluation of essays using Internet-enabled technology. (Include the structure for the student posting the essay, the student evaluating the essay,and the teacher(s).) Participants: readerdiane; crisp, Nicholasville, Kentucky

Wiki #6 - Science (Need one more participant.)

Simulated Laboratory Resources for K-12 science
Computer laboratories are starting to replace the hands-on labs used in some advanced science courses. Look up some articles on the debate. It is difficult for teachers to determine which experiment should be done in the simulated laboratories and which should be done in an actual lab. Find some experiments. Include a hyperlink to the experiment, the hypotheses that is being tested, and your opinion about whether it would be better to do in a real environment or the simulated one. Participants: wbosworth, Greendale, WI USA
Because there is only one person signed up under Science, this participant may either: recruit other people, post alone, or join another assignment of your choice.

Wiki #7 - Social Studies

[[Code of Ethics for Teaching Citizen Journalists|]]Citizen Journalism Code of Ethics
What is grassroots journalism (a/k/a citizen journalism) and what are examples of how it has affected recent news? Include examples. Propose a code of ethics for citizen journalists that could be shared in a high school or middle school classroom. Participants: julielindsay - Bangladesh; reuw - Kibbutz Kfar Etzion, Israel; mrehberg - Jackson, MI

Wiki #8 - Technology

Disruptive Technology in the Classroom
What is disruptive technology? Why is it called that? Create a list of disruptive technology, explain why it is considered disruptive and try to find one example of each technology being used to teach in an effective manner. Participants: qdsouza - Toronto, Canada; CLykowski - Lambertville, Michigan; jgates513, Summerdale PA.; aquiram - Yuma, AZ

Wiki #9 - Technology

Tagging to help Teachers
A wealth of curricula are being uploaded to youTube, Google Video, blogs, wikis, podcasts, etc. Some of things are being “tagged” appropriately and some are not. (See also folksonomy.) What is tagging? How can teachers use “tagging” to catalog their work? What would be the benefits of tagging standards? Create a proposed standard procedure that can be given to teachers to help them determine how to “tag” their digital work that is uploaded to the Internet so that it can be found and used appropriately. Participants: reuw - Kibbutz Kfar Etzion, Israel, rmom - Unionville, PA, jfriesen - Austin, TX, eweinb04

Wiki #10 - Technology

Student Data Storage- Needs and Methods
Students are increasingly required to produce and accumulate digital work. It is often stored in computer labs and purged at the end of the year. What is student data storage? Is it needed? You are to create a proposed methodology for student data storage that would be accessible to students after high school and also protects student privacy, rights and is fair (length of time it is available.) Participants: bookbird, Aliquippa, PA; maloneGE -VA; susanvg; cm_scholz - Cairo, Egypt

Note from Vicki: I almost took this one off, but when I showed my students the five questions I had drafted, they voted this one on. They said that this is their single biggest frustration and worry. Some students at other schools have created whole video productions that were "lost" over the summer. Students feel that they have a right to theri digital work and it often harms them when they cannot secure copies of their resume, etc. If our job as educators is to help students, this is an essential issue that should be discussed. I hope the participants will be excited about this assignment because my students said and I quote, "Teachers need to talk about protecting student digital work, it can be there to educate our grandchildren!"

Wiki #11 - Elementary Ed

Elementary School Internet Safety Code of Conduct
One of the risks of bringing elementary students online is that of internet safety and privacy. Propose an internet safety code of conduct for elementary teachers. (include hyperlinks.) Optionally, you may include a list of reasons that elementary students participate in online activites. (You may include examples of worthwhile projects. This should include hyperlinks.) Participants: mjantzi Gifted Ed.Teacher (Gds. K-5) in Virginia; Brune (Gordon Brune), 5th Grade Teacher, Mamaroneck, NY; mrdarylpearson - Saskatchewan, Canada; coffey - Virginia


Is it too late to sign up?


(You may request to join projects in progress through Friday 10/27. Limit 5 per project.)
A - Get an account with wikispaces
B - Request to join this space
(Tell me your name, your school, your location, the age you teach, and a little about yourself and the PROJECT YOU WISH TO JOIN in the comments. I will do my best to accommodate everyone, but may not be able to.)
C- I will add your name to the project that you are assigned here on this home page.
D- Go to the home page of this wiki - http://k12wiki.wikispaces.com.
Click the Notify me tab and sign up for either e-mail updates or updates via RSS.
(This will tell you when we've entered the next phase of the project. Just make sure to check your e-mail/ RSS reader on Wednesday to see your instructions for editing. Or just come back here.)


Guidelines to Get Started


Here are the recommended steps.
1- The hyperlink above is the page that has been created to wiki this topic. (Click on the page to go there and begin editing.)
2 - First you should divide up the question into major headings. Type them in the wiki. Leave space in between for the text.
3 - Start by defining the topic. You may want to search on wikipedia or Google. Read information, go back to your wiki page, click edit, and summarize the information. Include a hyperlink to the source of your information.
4 - Repeat #3 until you have a good definition.
5 - Read what you have on the wiki and ask yourself, "What do I still not understand?" Go to the Internet and answer that question. Come back and post.
6 - Remember to subscribe to your page on the Notify Me tab so you know when your partner(s) posts!

How long should I spend?


We are recommending 10 minutes on one day, then, walk away and let your partner post. Then, add 10 minutes the next day.
Judges will be e-mailed a list of projects which have postings on Sunday morning at 9 am EST. You should complete your postings to the wiki by then, although you are encouraged to update your wiki project any time you have additional information.

What if I don't know anything about the topic?


The topics were selected are emerging, new topics. The purpose of this project is to show you how wikis create experts on a topic within a very short period of time. You will find that your research on the Internet causes you to form an opinion and add it to your current knowledge base. Remember, Wikis are not word processors. Go out to the Internet, grab a "nugget" and come back and post and save.


Project Notes


  • All project instructions will be posted to the home page of this website.
  • For complete project instructions, visit the project page.
  • If you want to "play" on the wiki, go to the sandbox. Remember that people who post innappropriate information will be removed from the space!

How do I get Help?


Help

We have created a mini help on wikispaces section to help you.

Discussion Area

Go in the discussion area to discuss questions with your partner. (Remember to subscribe to the changes on your page!)

Moderators

You have Moderators available to help you. If you post your question in the discussion area, they are "patrolling" via RSS and will emerge to help you and answer your questions on Thursday and Friday. (Moderators will not available on the weekend.)If you need help, you can go to the brief guide on this space or click help in the top right corner of every wikipage.

Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Cool tools in my cool classroom



Just some notes for you. (I've been spending so much time in the K12 conference that I'll be posting more about that later.)

I've been using this conference as an opportunity for me to introduce Web 2.0 in depth to my 10th grade class and basic RSS to 9th. Here are the tools I've used:

Vyew - Desktop sharing and chatting. We've used this in 10th grade along with skype to test conferencing. It is pretty stable. I discussed the opportunities such programs have in light of our World is Flat discussions that we've been having. It creates a great discussion for how customer service can be around the world but help a person on their own computer.

Netvibes - I used to teach bloglines, however this summer, I began to use NetVibes. It is just easier for beginners to understand. When they really "get" RSS, they thank me. I had over half the class come in and tell me thank you.

Airset - This is my indispensible calendar tool. I showed my students how to create calendars and to subscribe using NetVibes. One student really got it and created a test calendar and shared it with her friends. They all imported into net vibes. That is so useful!

Gliffy - Drawing and editing. They love this and just so happen to have a Spanish project where they have to draw a floor plan of their home. Gliffy is just perfect for this!

Firefox 2.0 - The new firefox was released Monday. I taught my 9th grade how to search for the download on Google, find it, download, AND install it. (Yes, we did it all, I know I can do it myself, however, they would miss a great learning experience.) We made bookmarks, live bookmarks, discussed and used add ins, added search engines. I also had then subscribe to my classblogmeister blog using a live bookmark. Finally, for my 10th grade, I found a hack that let's one start Firefox from your memory key with all of your settings coming from there. We are going to try that tomorrow. The new Firefox also introduces a great discussion of phishing with all of the anti-phishing features it has. If you use a lot of plug ins- don't go out and upgrade, they don't guarantee that all of them work yet!

Of course, we wiki everything! These are just some of the things that we've done yesterday and today. In Accounting it is our two weeks of SAT prep. We are making review videos and have divided up the material. They are actually excited! We'll see how that goes and if I have some to share with you.

I also enjoyed a great evening at Tapped In. Jennifer Wagner, the Technospud, taught me what to do. I wandered around and finally, a kind "receptionist" helped me find the right chat. Jennifer has some great new projects coming up including a holiday card project, a Charlotte's web project with a real online web component (but hey it teaches adjectives!), and an e-mail project! They are filling up so quickly now and she is limiting the size, so make note of the sign up dates.

Have a great night and remember that pioneers have to blaze trails that are very uncomfortable and difficult. If too many people think "it" is a good idea, you're too late. You're right on time.

Keep the faith!

Monday, October 23, 2006

K12 Online Conference Presentation - Sign up now to Wiki



The K12 online conference has officially begun. I've already had two teachers sign up for the live wiki project.

To say I'm nervous is an understatement! After this wild weekend after having my 11 tips for supervising your child online picked up by Lifehacker and the typical scathing remarks that accompany such a link from such an amazing blog. (Gee, I've never been called a pessimist before! My husband says I'm too optimistic. And a few other evil things that I did not print in the comments.) I guess I'm feeling a little, well, unsure. On the conference blog, I sit amidst a list of incredible presenters with amazing things to say,

I wonder, (as I am sure all presenters do)

"Will anyone know how I poured my heart, soul, and gutts into this presentation for the conference?" "Will they make fun of my audio gaffs as I learned to do video as I made the presentation?" "Will anyone join in the K12 live wiki project?"

I do have several teachers here that are participating, but I'm downloading the presentations and giving them out on CD!

They wonder --

How does it work? How to I participate? Why is it free?

So, edubloggers, your work is cut out for you. Share the news of the conference and help others participate. (via cd if necessary) As for me, my Mom always told me that if I learn something new that can help others, it is my job to teach others and share it and that is what I've done. If one classroom benefits, then great. But, I always feel this way when I speak or sing or put myself out there.

It is a feeling of vulnerability that I guess that no one likes too much. I do know this, I feel called to this work. I am called to be a teacher and to encourage and share what I learn with you! I am grateful that God has blessed me with so many kind readers who are so gracious and encouraging (even when drive-by commenters do their dirty work on me!)

Here is my K12 presentation
as reprinted from the conference blog with permission.

Victoria A. Davis
Camilla, Georgia, USA
Blog: http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/

Presentation Title
“Wiki Collaboration Across the Curriculum”

Bio
Vicki Davis is a teacher and technology administrator at Westwood Schools in Camilla, Georgia. She has taught for four years at the high school and middle school level. For ten years prior, she taught professional development courses for teachers and college level adult computer literacy training. She is known for her award winning class wiki, wiki-centric classroom structure, and use of broad scope of Web 2.0 tools to improve student performance. She is a graduate of the Leadership Georgia program and graduated first in her class from Georgia Tech. She actively blogs her experiences at the Cool Cat Teacher blog and has been cited in the Boston Globe and Wired News for her work with wikis.

Description
Vicki loves it when she gets students excited! She loves it even more when she know that she has covered difficult material and the students had fun and retained the information. Vicki has become convinced that research-based think-pair-share and post lesson summarization are employed effectively whether you use paper, oral discussion, or online collaborative learning tools such as the wiki. The basic methodology (and result) is the same although the medium is different.

Last November 2005, Vicki was a scared beginner when she ventured out onto this new Internet that experts call Web 2.0. Within one month, her class wiki was named wikispace of the month and was being recognized as a model classroom for wiki use. But the most profound change was inside her classroom. Her classroom went from a challenging, rigorous curriculum to a challenging, rigorous, and fun curriculum with increased student involvement. Vicki will share what she has done with you in the hopes that you can learn more quickly than she did.

Vicki has done this in two ways: a video with show notes and a live wiki project for YOU to join in. So, if you want to learn something new (and have a sense of humor) we hope you’ll join the presentation. Vicki welcomes feedback on this blog or on her Cool Cat Teacher blog.

Video Presentation Outline:

  1. Wiki Background
  2. Why students need to know how to wiki
  3. A brief overview of the active portion of this project
  4. The pedagogical use of wikis in the classroom
  5. Wiki assessment strategies
  6. Common questions from school administrators

Note: To show you how rapidly things change, this presentation was finished on Sunday, October 15th and on Monday, October 16th, wikispaces has announced a new feature to help with the concurrent editing problem of wikis.

Presentation

PC users right click, Mac users control click to download for viewing …
http://k12online.wm.edu/k12wikipresentatation_LowRes.wmv 18 MB
http://k12online.wm.edu/k12wikipresentation_highres.wmv 41 MB

Supporting Links
Show Notes
http://k12online.wm.edu/K12shownotes.pdf

Wiki Grading Rubric
http://k12online.wm.edu/WikiGradingRubric.pdf

Components of an effective Web 2.0 Classroom
http://k12online.wm.edu/Web20classroom.pdf

Active Project Outline: The K12 Wiki Project
1 - Sign up to participate at the conference wiki project wiki - http://k12wiki.wikispaces.com/
Our live wiki project. Sign up and request to join the space before 8 AM EST Wednesday, October 24th. All project instructions are on the wiki home page.

2 - Team Announcements
You will have your team assignments posted on the wiki Thursday, October 26th.

3 - Wiki on your topic for up to 20 minutes
You will have until Saturday, October 28th to spend two 10 minute sessions editing your wiki. (Vicki will have volunteers on the wiki to answer your questions and help you.)

4 - Awards
Three Amazing judges, Andrea Forte (wiki researcher), Stewart Mader (wiki author), Jennifer Wagner (international collaborative teacher projects) will evaluate and judge the best wiki of this project. (See the K12wiki for their bios.)

5 - Listen in on the skypecast
Winners will be announced at the concluding skypecast (https://skypecasts.skype.com/skypecasts/skypecast/detailed.html?id_talk=45270%29 on Monday, October 30, at 8 pm EST (October 31 at 1:00 am GMT). Some of the judges will join us and we will give you some ways that you can match your classrooms to wiki with others that match your objectives.

Saturday, October 21, 2006

Women of Web 2.0 Podcast at EdTech Talk



The first podcast of Women of Web 2.0 is now posted at EdTech Talk. We discuss some neat things, from keyboarding to the fact the children of famous people are now tarnishing the rep of "dear old Dad" with their blogs or myspace presence.

This was our agenda:

  • Welcome and sharing of our mission statement
  • Introduction of each of us, how we got into Web 2.0.
  • What Web 2.0 tools each of us have implemented.
  • Benefits of implanting Web 2.0 in the classroom.
  • The Dangers of NOT implementing Web 2.0 in the classroom.
  • What is Women of Web 2.0 and who is included?
  • Q & A
Nice surprises include a discussion with Sus from Denmark about the efficacy of using translation services on your blog and a short sidetrack into keyboarding discussions. (I think this is the hidden enemy of everything we are doing with technology and most are strangely silent. This is another case of some people assuming that kids just intrisicly "know" how to do these things.)

I've been leery of committing to a weekly podcast myself but I think I and the other ladies have worked out an arrangement and between us. This way, each of us can participate but if we need to put our family first for school events, we still have flexibility!

The purpose of Women of Web 2.0:

OUR MISSION STATEMENT

"Our mission is to provide a professional feminine voice in educational Web 2.0 discussions. Conversations coming from the women of web 2.0 will move across gender, race, and country lines and display the beautiful diversity of the internet kaleidoscope. We are advocates for professional ethics, emerging technologies, collaborative projects, quality best practices research, and teaching students critical thinking skills. We are non-partisan and pro-student."


We are not for women only! The Women of Web 2.0 are the four of us (for now!)

I hope you'll join in the wow2 bulletin board, where the four of us visit and respond to questions and learn from YOU!

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

K12 Keynote: How to Open and Play an MP4 file.



OK. It has taken me two days to download and to get my computer to open David Warlick's Keynote for the Online K12 Conference. I have almost given up, but finally figured it out!

Windows Media Player nor Real player nor QuickTime will view MP4 files without a codec installed. A Codec is like a translation service.

So, here is how you do that. (It took me 30 minutes to figure it out.)

1 - Go to http://www.free-codecs.net/FFDShow_download.htm
2 - Download the FFDShow program and go with the defaults. (Unless you have a video editor and know what you're doing.)
3 - Extract and Install the program which will install the codec.
4 - Open your preferred video player and then Go to File --> Open and Open up David's Movie that you have already downloaded onto your computer!

This should do it! I will also say that I had to try to download the presentation at least three times, but it just downloaded lickety split for me a moment a go.

I hope you enjoy it and I'm about to grade and listen to Dave!

I'm sure there is an easier way to do this and if you have it, let me know. I have to work at it!

Monday, October 16, 2006

K12 Online Planning Guide



The K12 conference is just a little over a week away but the preconference keynote was delivered today.

For those of you who don't know about this amazing opportunity, many of our Web 2.0 leaders have organized the first ever online K12 conference. I am going to be presenter in the Week in the Classroom area (Monday, October 23) and produced a 28 minute educational video with show notes about how I wiki in the classroom. Here are some dates and times to be aware of.

1) Graduate School Credit

If you want to participate in the online K12 conference for graduate school credit, you need to line it up now! Three graduate school credits are being issued for your participation! What a great opportunity! Sign up now!

2) Get ready to listen

David Warlick, the man who got me started in a "new life," delivered a fireside chat tonight via Elluminate with the very energetic Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach moderating! (Whew is she an amazing dynamo!) He also posted an amazing keynote that you should listen to (just download it if you have broadband, it is 85 mb)

These will be hosted at Elluminate so, before you get ready to listen, go ahead and download the Elluminate Software at http://tinyurl.com/rpt4a

I will participate with the other Week 1 presenters on October 26th at 7 pm EST. I don't know how much talking I'll have to do with the other amazing folks that are presenting! (I really just like to sit there and soak in the joy of being around other people in the same boat.)

3) Get Ready to Learn

This is a great opportunity to learn. The agenda has been posted. Remember, that for the items except for the live events, you can download and watch/listen while you're doing other things. (Like grading papers!)

4) Come on and Wiki With Vicki

I'm so excited about my part of this, I'm going to give you a little "heads up." We're going to have a live wiki option for my presentation. I will release the URL next Monday and you can sign up on Monday and Tuesday. Then, on Wednesday, registration will close and I will pair you up by subject area to wiki (according to the wiki guidelines I use in my classroom) on a topic that hopefully most of you KNOW NOTHING about with 4 other teachers from around the world! Then, next Thursday through the following Sunday, October 29th, you will take time to post.

I want to demonstrate to you how rapidly you (and your students) can become an expert on a completely new topic! It will be fun and I'm asking that each participant only wiki in 2 - 10 minute sessions -- no more! That is the format I use in my class and I want to show you that wiki-ing doesn't have to take long.

I will be using the model that I have in my wiki classroom and will have some "volunteers" helping you and answering your questions.

Skypecast, Monday, October 30th at 8 PM EST
Then, on Monday, October 30th at 8 pm EST, I and the judges who are available will do a live skypecast to summarize the project and discuss the potential uses of wikis in education. Jennifer will also have an amazing announcement about how teachers will be able to find other classrooms to "wiki with" in the future.

Awards

I'm most excited about our judges! I'M PSYCHED! We will judge the wikis and announce several "best wiki of conference" awards. Our judges are Stewart Mader, Jennifer Wagner, and Andrea Forte. Let me tell you a little about them.

Stewart Mader -
Stewart Mader is Senior Instructional Technologist for Life Sciences and the Brown Medical School at Brown University. He publishes the blog Using Wiki in Education, which focuses on using the wiki for collaborative curriculum development and group learning, and includes interviews with wiki makers and users, example wiki uses, and product reviews. On October 24th, he is publishinga wiki-based book titled Using Wiki in Education. It's a collection of case studies from teachers using the wiki in a variety of settings, from high school to small liberal arts college, major research university and fully online/distance learning. The book will be available online at wikiineducation.com.

He has taught science both in the classroom and online, specializes in using social software and wiki technology in education, and works with faculty to apply technology and assess its impact on student learning. He previously served as Educational Technologist at Emerson College, Instructional Designer and Interim Director of the Faculty Center for Learning Development at University of Hartford, and has collaborated with faculty at Long Island University on a series of teaching and learning projects. He holds a B.S. in Chemistry from University of Hartford, and is pursuing an M.S. in Curriculum Development and Instructional Technology from the University at Albany.

Jennifer Wagner
In 1999, Jennifer was looking for an interesting way to collect data for a science fair project and posted her question to the EdTech newsgroup board, and the O.R.E.O. Online Project was born. The O.R.E.O. Project is now in its eighth year and TechnoSpud.com hosts seven online projects during each year. She recently was the USA winner for the Global SchoolNet Foundation Teacher Award in 2006 and also was a finalist for 2002, 2003, 2003, & 2004 for her online projects and effective uses in teacher telecollaboration.. In addtion to this, she also has been awarded the Inspired Teacher Scholarship -- Inspiration Software 2005, 2006 Time Warner Cable National Teacher Awards Finalist, Surfaquarium Award, & SIGTel Online Learning Award 2006 3rd PlaceI Her TechnoSpud website also has a monthly newsletter with Great Links, Software Reviews, and a 30-Minute Technology Tip for teachers to print out and use immediately in their classroom or lab.

Jennifer graduated from Pacific Christian College in 1992. Though self-taught in many software programs, Jennifer continues to take any technology course she has time for. Jennifer was a tutor on AOL for several years, AACTchJen, in the Homework Help Area. She also teaches online at LVS Online in all Office programs. However, one of her favorite activities is traveling the US providing enthusiastic seminars and leaving teachers excited with ideas on how to use their computers immediately in their classrooms. She just published her first book, 35 Tech Tips for Teachers which is available at www.lulu.com/techospud and is proud to be a founding member of the Women of Web 2.0, an online presence for educators using the tools of Web 2.0.

Websites: Technospud.com, TechnospudProjects.com, Online Projects4Teachers.com

Women of Web 2.0

Blog: http://www.onlineprojects4teachers.com/wordpress/


Andrea Forte -

Andrea Forte is Ph.D. candidate specializing in human-centered computing
at Georgia Tech's College of Computing. Her current research focuses on
written communities of discourse and social contexts for learning through
writing. With support from the National Science Foundation, she is
working with Amy Bruckman to develop new wiki tools for classrooms and
investigate notions of audience and identity as she explores how students'
writing practices are transformed as they interact in online spaces.
Andrea holds an MLIS from the Graduate School of Library and Information
Science (now School of Information) at University of Texas at Austin and a
BA in foreign language and literature with a minor in philosophy from
Western Michigan University.

The Active Wiki Project
So, you get an opportunity to experience a true wiki learning process with amazing researchers, writers, and international educational project managers giving you feedback. I don't know of any paying conference that gives you that! (This one is FREE!)

It doesn't stop there!
The Web 2.0 pie is so big and there are so many of you out there doing groundbreaking things. There are so many other amazing presenters that are doing things at this conference. I was going to post a list of my must listens, but I want to listen to them all!

This is an amazing opportunity!

Lots of good intentions out there to take part.

Well, right now if you're really an advocate of Web 2.0 in the classroom, stand up and tell everyone about this conference!


If they hear it from someone else, then you have more credibility! Email the hyperlink to the conference, have teachers in at lunch to hear some highlights. Download it and put it on a professional development folder on your server (to save bandwidth!) Require each teacher to pick one or two conferences and then report back to the other faculty.

It is time to put your actions where your blog is folks, and birth some newbies here! Get out there blog, print out, e-mail, and talk it up. The time is now.

Do not quit! My Dad always says "if everyone says its a great idea, you're too late."

You're right on time. K12onlineconference.org


Northern California Teachers - Google Teacher Academy



Google For Educators
Google has some new tools for us to use to use Google in the classroom. Actually Google is part of my Socratic teaching method already. As I peruse it, I'll let you know what I find.

Google Teacher Academy
If you live in Northern California, you should apply for the Google Teacher Academy (http://www.edgateway.net/cs/google/print/docs/754) The applications are due October 22 and you need to create a one minute video. This is going to be a pilot program! Go for it! Google Says:

The November 7th, 2006, pilot program is available only to K-12 educators working in Northern California. This includes classroom teachers, curriculum specialists, technology leaders, administrators, and professional trainers. The event is FREE, but participants must provide their own travel. For the pilot program, we only have room for 50 experienced educators. An application is required to participate, and Google will select educators into the program based on their professional experience, their passion for teaching and learning, and their successful use of technology in K-12 settings.


If you go, I'd like to set up an interview with you afterwards so we can share with other cool cat teacher readers what you learned!

Hat tip to Musings from the Academy for this information.


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